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Wednesday, April 11 • 2:30pm - 2:45pm
SYMPOSIA-16: Are Good or Poor Dispersers More Sensitive to Land Use Intensification? A Quantitative Review

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AUTHORS: Amanda E Martin*, Lenore Fahrig – Geomatics and Landscape Ecology Research Laboratory, Carleton University

ABSTRACT: Human land use intensification – including urbanization, intensive agriculture, and increasing road density – can put wildlife species at risk of extinction. Most researchers expect that sedentary species are more sensitive to land use intensification than dispersive species, because dispersive species can recolonize or rescue local populations in a patchy landscape. This has led some conservation biologists and land managers to prioritize conservation of sedentary over dispersive species. Here we ask whether this is a reasonable strategy. Should we expect that sedentary species are generally more sensitive to the negative effects of land use intensification than dispersive species? And, under what conditions (if any) should we expect the opposite? We conducted a quantitative review using the results from 83 cross-species observational, experimental, or meta-analytic studies reporting 486 effects of species dispersal ability on their responses to land use intensification. As expected, sedentary species were typically more sensitive to the negative effects of land use intensification than dispersive species. Nevertheless, ~30% of the time dispersive species were more sensitive than sedentary species. Our analyses also suggest that the effect of dispersal ability on species’ sensitivity to land use intensification varies among taxa. For invertebrates and plants, sedentary species were typically more sensitive than dispersive species. In contrast, for vertebrates, dispersive species were typically more sensitive than sedentary species, and the same was true when comparing across taxonomic groups. Our findings suggest that one cannot simply assume that sedentary species are more sensitive to land use intensification than dispersive species.

Wednesday April 11, 2018 2:30pm - 2:45pm CDT
Grant Park Parlor